Go Trekking In Papua New Guinea For The Ultimate Adventure

Hiking in Papua New Guinea takes trekking to a whole new level and is an experience no one will ever forget.

Traditional Dance in Papua New Guinea 


Papua New Guinea is one of the most intrepid destinations to explore in the world and few people ever get to visit the island nation. The island is located on the equator just north of Australia and is covered in lush untouched rainforests. Papua New Guinea is a dazzling destination that is a challenge to visit.


Traveling in Papua New Guinea is a challenge due to the lack of infrastructure, but the rewards are unforgettable. Neighboring Papua New Guinea is the forgotten island nation of the Solomon Islands (an unexplored tropical island paradise).


Papua New Guinea – One Of The World’s Most Unique Destinations

Papua New Guinea (appreciated PNG) occupies the western half of the island of New Guinea. It has been independent since 1975 and is an extremely diverse and traditional country.

Related: The Solomon Islands Are Still Home To This Oceanliner Wreck

The nation has some 839 known languages (more than any other country in the world) and only around 13% of the population lives in urban centers.

Most people continue to live in customary communities and around 40% of its population are substance farmers. The population is estimated to be around 9 million, although the real population is not known.

One island region of Papua New Guinea called Bougainville was famous for massive World War Two battles and may be the world’s next independent country. In the jungles and on the beaches of Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, visitors can discover World War Two military machinery graveyards.

Papua New Guinea Is An Intrepid Traveler’s Destination Ideal For Trekking Through The Jungles

Papua New Guinea is a country with little infrastructure outside the main city of Port Moresby (even the main towns of the country are not completely connected by road).

There is little developed tourist infrastructure (although it does exist). It is also a country where visitors are recommended to book organized tours.

Related: 10 Best Tropical Islands To Visit In The Pacific

One of the best ways to explore PNG is by hiking through the dense jungles. While it is difficult to get around much of the country by road, one can get anywhere on foot.

The country is full of magnificent trails, sites, and adventures that just can’t be experienced anywhere else in the world.

Visitors can choose from hiking in the jungles for just a few hours all the way up to hiking for eight or more days through the jungles. The more intrepid travelers wall across the backbone of Papua New Guinea and summit the country’s highest peak.

The Top Treks In Papua New Guinea

The Kokoda Track:

The Kokoda Track is of particular significance to Australians. During World War Two, Papua New Guinea was administered and defended by Australia when the Japanese invaded the northern end of the island.

The Japanese then advanced south, trekking over the island on the Kokoda Track to take the Australian stronghold of Port Moresby and then use it as a base to threaten Australia itself.

The Australians marched along the jungle track to meet the Japanese, and it was here that the Aussies fought some of their most significant engagements with the Japanese in the Pacific War (Australia won the campaign).

  • Length: 96 km or 60 miles
  • Duration: 8 to 10 days

Today people came and hike along the 96 km (60 miles) track that stretches through the rugged mountainous terrain of the Owen Stanley ranges.

Mount Wilhelm:

New Guinea is famous for the Highlands region (which is very different from the Lowlands). The region is famous for Mt. Wihelm which rises to 4,509 meters (14,770 feet) and is a very popular destination for mountain climbers visiting the island.

This is a tough climb and visitors should have an experienced guide (they can be arranged at hostels or the PNG Trekking Association).

Lark Force Wilderness Track:

Another great option is the Lark Force Wilderness Track, where people can explore the pristine jungle in the East New Britain province. This track is regarded as one of the most accessible in the country (but that doesn’t mean it’s anywhere near easy).

The hike is challenging and takes around 4 days to cover the track’s 60 km or 40 miles. Along the route, one can learn about the Australian Army’s escape from the advancing Japanese Forces in 1941.

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